“We can’t do this anymore.”, writes New York Times writer Thomas Friedman in a recent op-ed article.

manufacturingspaceballFriedman reference is to our recent economic ideologies that have landed us in smack in the middle of an unprecedented global recession. He continues, “We must have growth, but we must grow in a different way. For starters, economies need to transition to the concept of net-zero, whereby buildings, cars, factories and homes are designed not only to generate as much energy as they use but to be infinitely recyclable in as many parts as possible. Let’s grow by creating flows rather than plundering more stocks.”

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In the past, economic recessions often been met with sullen struggling at the level of the individual, to ‘weather the storm’ in order to maintain remnants of a quality of life threatened by a suddenly merciless economic environment. However, Friedman’s point raises question about how we face these economic doldrums and the fundamental choices we have as individuals, especially in our present context. Instead of trying to find meager ways to maintain our quality of life’, Friedman is essentially asking us to reinvent our systems, our way of thinking, to align closer to the quality of life we should be living. Ultimately, could this recession be an opportunity to provide a more full existence to our daily grind?

Today, more than ever before, our collective history, global identity and advances in technology have paved the way to answer this question in a way to create a new kind of economic ‘recession’. Instead of wallowing in the gloom, we can realize that we are poised to turn potential for global suffering into milestone for human civilization, one that opens up new and creative ways to live in balance with the world. Even better, the economy is already moving to meet you halfway! Where there was once a prolific need to feed the conspicuously consuming machine, now there is a burgeoning job market specifically geared to promoting a sustainable world. As individuals, this means we are all tasked now to take control of our way of life, and realign it with the fundamental principles of the world around us.

3328055815_f531056d21In a recent online article by CNN, there is clear reason to start seeing if a job in renewable energy is something you might consider. Aside from an $11 billions being earmarked specifically to help people move toward homes using on renewable energy, job creation focusing on long term technologies such as fuel-cells is currently on the rise.

At fastcompany.com, similar rumblings are becoming clearer. Specifically, they reveal the growing need for jobs in sustainable practices, not just renewable energy. They list out green jobs likely to grow in numbers for the next decade, from more locally-based farmers, urban planners focused on lowering overall city carbon production, and more closed-loop manufacturers focused solely on creating an industry for active recycling.

And in case you are wondering what green jobs are the top ten to grab, here’s a list of the top ten:

pv-installer1-Conservation Biologist

2-Farmer Forester

3-Solar Power Installer

4-Energy Efficiency Builder

5-Wind Turbine Manufacturer

6-Conservation biologist

7-Green MBA and Entrepreneur

8-Recylcer Sustainability

9-Systems Developer

10-Urban Planner

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